Biomechanics

Orthopaedic Surgery Biomechanical Laboratory

The Biomechanics Laboratory conducts a wide range of basic science and applied research projects in orthopaedic biomechanics. Research methods often encompass in-vitro experiments with human or animal specimens and the use of computer modeling and analysis.


Space

biomechanics1(2)The Orthopaedic Biomechanics Lab is located at Marquette University in Cramer Hall, Room 165, (800 ft2), and includes space for specimen storage, dissection and preparation space for laboratory experiments. This lab is designed and maintained to support basic science and applied research projects in orthopaedic biomechanics. Research methods often encompass in-vitro experiments with human or animal cadaveric specimens and the use of computer modeling and analysis.


Equipment

Available equipment includes: 1) MTS 809 servo hydraulic axial-torsion material testing system with a pair of hydraulic grips, 8 additional analogue data collection channels, and FlexTest 40 controller; 2) Optotrak Certus Motion Analysis System with 8 additional analogue data collection channels; 3) customized load frame for testing with static loads; 4) an equine portable radiograph unit; 5) Tekscan K-Scan joint pressure measurement system with software and five sensors; 6) AMTI six-axis load-cell and signal amplifier and other uni-axial load cells; 7) Microstrain 3mm micro-miniature DVRTs, 8) various LVDTs displacement transducers; 9) miniature pressure transducers, 10) assorted power and manual tools and surgical instruments.


Personnel

The laboratory is staffed with a full-time engineer who holds a degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and twenty years of experience of working in the lab.


Funding

The laboratory is supported by the general operating funds of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and grants.


Current research topics include

  • Studies of the stability of total-joint replacement
  • Acetabular cup and hip stem micromotion
  • Joint mechanics
  • Biomechanical analysis of subtalar motion
  • Spine mechanics
  • Experimental and computational evaluation of spinal instrumentation
  • Bracing in scoliosis and spine fractures
  • Planned projects include:
  • Three-dimensional finite element modeling of the pelvis
  • Strain measurement in the pelvis and ankle ligaments
  • A study of femoral neck fractures